7 Ultimate Quality Guarantee
Foundamental Principles
Gtrace+
Food Safety & Quality Assurance
FAQ
 

Everyone would rather our food were 100% safe all the time. However much we would like it to be so, there is no such thing as 100% safety. We can never guard ourselves 100% against criminal conduct or human error.

At D.B.E. Gurney Resource Berhad we can and we want to do everything to make our products as safe as possible. We operate in accordance with all internationally recognised quality systems.
We check our own work continuously in-house, so that we can act immediately when something somewhere is not up to standard.
We also have our quality systems checked by external accredited inspection organisations.

Finally, our key buyers visit our plants regularly. They carry out their own inspections to ensure we are doing what we promise. Five to ten of these inspections are conducted within D.B.E. Gurney Resource Berhad every week.



Click on one of the links below to read more about Food Safety at D.B.E. Gurney Resource Berhad.

Zoonoses
D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd’s Salmonella control system
Feed
Poultry Farms
Abattoirs
Decontamination
Labelling


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Zoonoses

In our production chain we pay particular attention to zoonoses, which are infectious diseases occurring in animals but which can also be transmitted to humans. They occur in dogs and cats, for instance, as well as in farm animals such as chickens. The best-known examples of these are the salmonella and campylobacter bacteria.

At D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd we believe we have to take all necessary steps to cut any undesirable substances or bacteria down to the lowest possible level. Accordingly, we make every effort to prevent listeria, salmonella and campylobacter infections. We work in accordance with Belgian and Dutch disease control programmes and have implemented additional measures in the vertically integrated D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd organisation.

As from 1 January 2006, the Ministry of Public Health in the Netherlands will ban the sale of fresh chicken contaminated with salmonella. The purpose of all measures is to guarantee the safety of chicken products for consumers by cutting down and controlling bacteria.

These disease control programmes are based on prevention and avoiding contamination. Every stage in the production chain, for instance, must comply with stringent hygiene requirements.
In addition to the national programmes, D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd has set up its own system which exceeds the overall requirements. Our system applies to all stages of the production chain, from breeding grandparent birds up to and including processing. The system consists of three stages: First of all a process or a plant is rendered salmonella-free. Next, preventive measures are taken in to avoid fresh infection, followed by continuous inspection which goes hand in hand with meticulous work.

It is important for plants to be made swiftly aware of the presence of any undesirable substances or bacteria. Through the MasterLab Nutreco laboratory, D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd has access to ultramodern, extremely rapid testing which can detect such undesirable substances and bacteria at a very early stage. We know within a very short period of time whether they are present, enabling us to take immediate action. Measures to be taken subsequently depend on the type of plant or on the stage of the production chain.



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D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd’s Salmonella control system

The approach to controlling salmonella was started years ago in breeding operations, with the grandparent birds. This was followed by the parent birds and the hatcheries. Disease control begins with intensive sampling of the breeding and parent bird farms to prevent introduction into the hatchery and vertical infection of the chicks.

Birds infected with salmonella on a breeding farm are treated or removed. This is followed by a mandatory hygiene examination and a tracing investigation in consultation with a GVP-accredited veterinary surgeon. On the breeding farms we take a sample every day from the production areas and from the extracted air.

Transporting breeding eggs and day-old chicks must comply with stringent hygiene requirements. We check this by taking regular and unannounced samples from lorries. Nowadays day-old chicks are almost always delivered completely salmonella-free.



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Feed

Bacteria can also be harboured in feed, which is why D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd feed plants do not use any risk-bearing raw materials and check them prior to incorporation into the feed. We almost always heat the feed in such a way that any salmonella are killed off.

The feed plants also apply numerous hygiene measures to prevent infection. Poultry farmers in turn retain a sample of every feed delivery. In this way it can be established whether the feed has played a part in an unexpected outbreak of infection. Nowadays infection risks have also been done away with in feed plants. The D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd feed plants in Deventer and Merksem are salmonella-free, with all samples to date proving negative.



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Poultry farms

Numerous measures are being implemented on poultry farms to keep the salmonella bacterium at bay. In addition to feed samples, poultry farmers will carry out manure tests, for instance, when the chickens are 12 and 35 days old. Samples of down from chicks or samples from the inserts in the trays for day-old chicks are also taken. Poultry farmers retain the results from these samples.
Sampling and carrying out checks provides the poultry farmer with a good understanding of the condition of his farm. Visitors are recorded and disinfection washes are used on every farm. Special work wear and footwear are mandatory for anyone intending to enter the farm.

If a salmonella infection has been established at a poultry farm, it is mandatory that the poultry farmer thoroughly cleans the shed floors in the usual way after the chickens have been disposed of. Next, he is to carry out a hygiene examination in all sheds. In the event of infection occurring repeatedly, a special plan is to be drawn up jointly with the GPV-accredited veterinary surgeon.

If a farm is salmonella-free, this does not mean that the bacteria will stay away. Nature is stubborn and not always controllable. An infection can recur at any time through contact with the surroundings. The D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd system sets out guidelines on how to deal with an infection in this situation.

Many poultry farms in the vertically integrated D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd organisation are already free from salmonella. The source of the infection is still being traced on several farms.



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Abattoirs

Abattoirs and processing sites play an important part in combating salmonella. Abattoirs apply a special logistics system for this purpose. Birds free from salmonella are processed first, not switching to any infected pairs until the end of the day. The meat from these birds is kept separate.

Cross-contamination always remains a critical issue at processing sites, where we set stringent requirements for cleaning and disinfection. At D.B.E. Gurney Resource Bhd therefore we always take a sample from each continuous batch from a single poultry farmer to be tested for salmonella. We take further samples at various locations in production, from caeca, breast skin, neck skin, filet and end products as well as the equipment. In addition to this our customers come and check for themselves whether we have our house in order.



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Decontamination

The only method of achieving a guarantee of zero salmonella infection is decontamination. However, it is the very last resort and beforehand all stages of the production chain must have taken all possible steps to become salmonella free.

Decontamination means disinfecting the chicken meat, which is done by immersing the meat in lactic acid. In the United States this is a commonplace technique which delivers outstanding results. Lactic acid is a substance produced by the body in large amounts. It is a by-product of muscle activity and is absorbed into the bloodstream. Lactic acid occurs naturally in cheese, yoghurt, wine and sauerkraut. The acids in these products impede the growth of bacteria such as salmonella and campylobacter.



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Labelling

In the Netherlands it has been mandatory since 2001 to affix a label to every pack of chicken. The label indicates how to handle chicken in the kitchen. It includes storage and preparation recommendations, for instance, but does not state whether the product has been checked for diseases such as salmonella.

The presence of salmonella or campylobacter in a product need not be harmful. Provided the chicken is prepared normally and heated through properly, there is no risk to anyone.



 

Quality assurance receives a great deal of attention at DGRB: it is based on the DBE ISO & HACCP programme. It aims for sustainable production in areas such as the approach to health aspects, product safety, product quality and environmental issues.

The DGRB businesses are audited every 1-3 years, giving management a good insight into the performance of the various companies. At DGRB we do of course work in accordance with all legal guidelines. We actively monitor changes in legislation and implement them swiftly. We are regularly ahead of legislation when we introduce measures. In addition we work in accordance with the guidelines set out in the DVS, SALT and HACCP. At DGRB, we have added a number of items to it for checking.

A large number of inspection and management systems and in-house quality projects extend right across our companies and throughout the production process – both horizontally and vertically. Combined, they constitute the Total Quality programme. Five to ten inspections are conducted every week in the DGRB production chain. Everything is combined together under the Gtrace+™ umbrella, and all data from the production chain are recorded.

 

Monitoring and management systems
 
  • ISO 9001:2000
  • HACCP (by Moody International)
  • GHP - Good Husbandry Practice (by Dept of Veterinary Services Malaysia)
  • Planned approach to zoonoses
Internal quality projects and programmes
 
  • Feed to Food
Quality standards
 
  • BRC
Customer-specific requirements
 
  • Customer-specific programmes
 
 

Monitoring and management systems

What is ISO?

ISO is a network of the national standards institutes of 153 countries, on the basis of one member per country, with a Central Secretariat in Geneva, Switzerland, that coordinates the system.

ISO is a non-governmental organization: its members are not, as is the case in the United Nations system, delegations of national governments. Nevertheless, ISO occupies a special position between the public and private sectors. This is because, on the one hand, many of its member institutes are part of the governmental structure of their countries, or are mandated by their government. On the other hand, other members have their roots uniquely in the private sector, having been set up by national partnerships of industry associations.

Therefore, ISO is able to act as a bridging organization in which a consensus can be reached on solutions that meet both the requirements of business and the broader needs of society, such as the needs of stakeholder groups like consumers and users.


What is HACCP?

Food Safety has become a worldwide concern. The devastating impacts a foodborne illness outbreak can have on not only lives, but on businesses and countries economics, have been well documented. Each year, hundreds of thousands of people throughout the world fall ill as a result of food poisoning and each year food companies pay out millions of dollars in compensation and suffer immeasurable damage to their business reputations. It is now generally accepted by legislators, enforcement officers and food professionals that a formal, structured HACCP system is the most effective way of managing and controlling food safety hazards in the preparation and handling of food and food products.

In recognition of this, Moody International has developed its own HACCP standard, using the basis of the Alimentarius Codex, and also incorporating specific requirements from FDA, WHO, and other internationally recognised organizations. This standard forms the basis of our certification, and carries the Accreditation of RvA, the Dutch National Accreditation Body, well known for taking the lead in Food Safety Certification schemes.

With the range of Moody International certification schemes, we are able to offer specific schemes such as HACCP, or this could also be combined with ISO 9001 or other management systems as required.

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What is GHP?

  • Procedures to ensure animals are farmed to meet a certain quality and safety requirement
  • Procedures describe the methods, equipments, facilities and controls for all farmed animals
  • Prerequisite program for food quality and safety plans
  • Develop, implement, review and verify for effectiveness
  • Ensure HACCP plans focus on CCP to produce safe food
  • Benefits :
    • To improve management practices
    • To avoid violative drug residues
    • To decrease production costs
    • To expand market for animal products


What is Zoonoses?

Any disease and/or infection which is naturally "transmissible from vertebrate animals to man" is classified as a zoonosis according to the PAHO publication "Zoonoses and communicable diseases common to man and animals". Over 200 zoonoses have been described and they are known since many centuries. They involve all types of agents: bacteria, parasites, viruses and unconventional agents.


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Internal quality projects and programmes

Feed to Food is the name of our in-house Gurney quality control programme. We use this to control all the risks in the production chain. We use a HACCP approach for this. However, the HACCP analysis is conducted across the entire production process rather than at each stage. From purchasing the raw materials for mixed feed to chicken products in the supermarket. Checking feed and meat for undesirable substances forms part of this.

Part of the Gurney Feed to Food programme is the chain information system for poultry farmers: Manage a Farm. This system was introduced from 2005. It enables us to optimise the overall quality in the poultry industry together with poultry farmers and plant managers.

The programme examines matters such as emissions, waste, energy costs, environmental effects, animal health and animal welfare.

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Quality standards

The BRC quality standard is the British supermarkets’ programme of quality requirements. BRC stands for British Retail Consortium. DGRB chicken products meet with these requirements.
Customer-specific requirements

A number of our customers work to company-specific quality criteria and require DGRB to comply with them. DGRB complies with all customer-specific programmes submitted to us.
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